Category Archives: Justice

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DCI boss Kinoti proposes new polices to help victims of sexual violence

Category : Justice , News

The Director of Criminal Investigations George Kinoti ha proposed formulation of new policies that will help police deal with cases of sexual violence.

Kinoti on Saturday said such strong policies will help adjudicate some of the critical issues surrounding sexual violence cases that have taken so lightly for a long time.

The DCI boss was speaking at a Nairobi hotel during a forum on sexual based violence.

Kinoti however took issues with how police have been handling the cases subjecting victims to more suffering and trauma.

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BREAKING CYCLES OF VIOLENCE:

Category : Justice , News , Research

‘I was targeted because my husband is from a different community that was perceived to hold a differing political opinion from the one of the dominant community we live in.’ Survivor of sexual violence during the 2017 elections interviewed in this research

Electoral-related sexual violence (ERSV) is a form of sexual violence, including rape, gang rape, sexual assault and defilement, associated with electoral processes and/or intended to influence or achieve a political end within an electoral process. In Kenya, sexual violence has been a recurrent feature of elections, which have been marred by deadly violence, unrest and serious human rights violations and abuses. Outbreaks of sexual violence during elections have been documented since the 1990s.

Following the post-election violence in 2007/2008, the Commission of Inquiry into the Post-Election Violence (CIPEV), known as the ‘Waki Commission’, documented 900 cases of sexual violence perpetrated by security agents, militia groups and civilians against both men, boys, women and girls in a context of large scale violence, mass displacement and more than 1,000 deaths.


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STRENGTHENING SAFE AND PROTECTIVE SPACES FOR WOMEN, GIRLS AND CHILDREN IN KENYA

Category : Justice , News , Research

The gross violation of rights and human suffering caused by gender-based violence (GBV) demands a comprehensive and multipronged approach to both prevention and response. One of the most crucial interventions in responding to GBV is the establishment of safe and protective spaces (SPSs)for survivors. SPSs offer some of the services most urgently needed by survivors such as emergency treatment, testing for HIV/AIDS, psychosocial counselling and legal advice.

Yet options for safe and protective spaces are scarce in the country and people fleeing violence are often unable to access havens of safety and other essential services. Most of the existing spaces are run by civil society organizations and depend on donor funding; as such, they tend to be short-term and unsustainable. The services offered in these spaces are not always comprehensive and gaps in linkages to existing referral pathways and services persist.


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Sexual violence victims can now make reports through mobile app

Category : Justice , News , Research

Victims of sexual violence can now make a report through a mobile application.

The ‘SV_CaseStudy’ app which can be downloaded from Google play store has been launched to encourage victims to make reports after it emerged most fear doing so for fear of being stigmatised.

The app will also make it easy to document and track the cases that have been reported. Currently, it is feared that many sexual violence cases go unreported due to fear.

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CARING FOR THE CARERS: SUPPORT SYSTEMS FOR GBV FIELDWORKERS

The importance of “self-care” has been recognised for many years in social work and women’s rights organisations in the Global North. It has also recently gained traction in feminist movements across the world. Despite this, the support needs of Southern gender-based violence (GBV) fieldworkers are widely disregarded in policy and practice, even as—mainly Northern—aid funding increases for GBV work worldwide.

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Hope as app to record sexual violence launched

Category : Justice , News

The Wangu Kanja Foundation in collaboration with the Survivors of Sexual Violence, United Nations Population Fund and Ministry of Interior launched a mobile application aimed at documenting the number of sexual violence cases in Kenya and ensuring that the survivors access all the services they need.

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Action for Global Justice

Category : Justice , News

Strategy 2028: Action for Global Justice represents the next step in our evolution, rooting us more deeply where we work, and with the people whose rights and visions we work to achieve. This strategy builds on learnings from our previous strategy, People’s Action to End Poverty, our history and practice.


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Survivors of sexual violence want peace and justice to reign in Kenya

Category : Justice , News , Research

Failure by the government to act on recommendations of the documented horrors in the 2007/8 Post Election Violence (PEV) report compiled by the Justice Philip Waki-led Commission on Inquiry into the Post-Election Violence (CIPEV) continues to be a source of concern which only compounds the fears of Kenyans. Almost ten years on from Kenya's brush with all-out civil war, the Waki Commission findings together with the Truth, Justice and Reconciliation Commission (TJRC) report remain dusty reference materials on government shelves. Read More...

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Kenyan women want justice over post-election sexual violence

Category : Justice

Six years after being gang-raped and beaten in front of her husband and four-year-old child during a wave of post-election violence in Kenya, Nancy is still awaiting justice.

If it were left to the country's director of public prosecutions, Keriako Tobiko, she would never see it. Last month, Tobiko announced that his office would bring no cases related to the 2007-08 atrocities before a new international crimes division (ICD) within the high court.

Nancy refuses to take no for an answer. On Tuesday she and other survivors of sexual and gender-based violence will be in a Nairobi courtroom, suing Tobiko and other senior government officials on numerous counts, including the failure to investigate and prosecute their cases and those of thousands of others.

Tobiko, along with the attorney general, Githu Muigai, another respondent in the case, was happy to promote the ICD to the Rome statute of the international criminal court (ICC) at a meeting of state parties in The Hague in November. Why there? The Kenyan president and deputy president, Uhuru Kenyatta and William Ruto, face charges at the ICC related to the post-election violence, so the country's two top prosecutors were eager to leave a good impression with foreign diplomats that Kenya is willing and able to deal with the atrocities domestically.

Indeed, last month Tobiko claimed a special taskforce had reviewed 5,000 cases related to the period, and 1,000 of these had been prosecuted, with 500 convictions. Yet the government will not provide any information to substantiate this claim, which is contradicted by the record of impunity and prior statements about the nature and extent of investigations and prosecutions made by Tobiko's office.

What we do know is that there have never been prosecutions of mid- and senior-level offenders, including many police officers, and that for most survivors, the Kenyan justice system has been unresponsive, at best. After her ordeal, Nancy, aided by other women, went to Nairobi Women's Hospital, where several tests were carried out. Armed with the results, she went to the local police station, where she was given a report number. Many women did not even get that far; their attempts to report crimes were often met with laughter and derision by officers.

Detectives contacted Nancy months later. She showed them where the assault happened and identified her attackers. But the matter was never pursued. She and thousands of other women – and some men – who experienced sexual violence feel abandoned by the government. Kenya's constitution grants Tobiko the authority to order fresh investigations, but he has not done so.

The case being heard on Tuesday is being brought by eight survivors and four civil-society organisations. This is not the first such constitutional case. Last year, a judge in central Kenya ruled that by failing to investigate 160 rapes of girls aged three to 17, Tobiko and the police had "contributed to the development of tolerance for pervasive sexual violence", and that their failures violated multiple provisions of national and international law.

He ordered detectives to investigate the cases of the 11 petitioners concerned, and to implement an article of the constitution that requires the police to implement standards of professionalism, integrity and respect for human rights.   Kenya's 2010 constitution has many progressive elements, and legislators have proposed or approved numerous laws, which, if implemented, would make significant contributions to ending the climate of impunity for sexual violence. They would also strengthen women's rights in such areas as administrative law and democratic representation. But for now, women must continue to fight for a Kenya in which sexual violence is no longer tolerated.   Dr Joan Nyanyuki is executive director of the Nairobi-based Coalition On Violence Against Women, one of the petitioners in Tuesday's case. - Source: The Guardian